10 Tips To Help You Cope With Redundancy

10 Tips To Help You Cope With Redundancy

Of all the people I meet through McGinnis Loy, those who tell me they have lost their job because of redundancy stand out for me, and there seems to be two distinct groups that people fit into. There are those candidates who have been working at the same company for years and years planning to be at the company until they retire; and those who recently joined (say less than 6 months ago) and can’t believe they are job hunting again. Interestingly, all of them use the same phrases to explain their feelings and the predicament they are left in – “Why me?”, “I am devastated”, “I never saw that coming”, “Is this the end of my working life?”, “The grass wasn’t greener after all”… and many more.

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The reasons people are made redundant in the first place is something I will cover in another blog post, as there is a whole host of reasons employers do it – both good and bad.  It doesn’t help coming into the job market at a time when the latest unemployment figures arent good either, something I will write more about in the next few weeks.  In summary though, September showed unemployment up by 80,000.  Whilst not good news, there was some better numbers from the private sector that was hardly mentioned by the media.  The coalition has always said it wanted to shrink the state’s payroll, and over the period of the ONS report, the public sector lost 111,000 employees (hence the balance being an 80,000 increase in unemployment)

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So, what can you do if you have been made redundant recently and are job hunting again? Here are ten tips which will hopefully help steer you in the right direction.

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Ten Tips To Help You Through Redundancy

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  • Give yourself time for the news to sink in so you can emotionally digest it, rather than rushing straight into another job search.  Being made redundant is something you cannot control as it is out of your hands.  Dealing with the reality and facts of the situation first means you will have a clearer head and a more focused mind to conduct your next job search

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  • Have a job strategy so you are prepared properly from the start.  We talk about this all the time here on Approachthemarket.com – the better prepared you are, hopefully the quicker success will be for you.  Some of our recent blogs on planning for your job search can be found here and here

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  • Look at the financial impact of being made redundant – how long will your savings or emergency money last?  Depending on the number of weeks/months the funds will cover you, will determine how long you have to find a new role.  If you have redundancy cover or income protection cover, remember to find the policy documents and get in touch with your insurers to help cushion the financial blow.

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  • Make sure you get an employer’s reference before you leave your company.  Not only will this confirm the reason stated on your CV is genuine, but a good reference will highlight your key skills and strengths to a new employer.  You can then use this reference in interviews to support your previous experience.

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  • Think seriously about what job you want to do next.  Being made redundant is not something you have personally instigated (unless you decided to take voluntary redundancy), and for many it is the perfect career cross-roads.  There are many stories of people who have been made redundant, which itself has given them the impetus to change career and in some instances set up their own business.

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  • Get free job advice where you can.  If you used to work for a large company, many employ outsourcing specialists who can help you decide what is the best way to approach the job market.  This will often be free as your previous employer pays for these specialists and many offer one-to-one consultations.

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  • Use recruiter’s and headhunter’s specific to your field/profession to help you find your next job.  Applying for roles online is quick and efficient, but it is completely impersonal.  You cannot talk to job boards on the phone or get their professional advice, which you can do if you know the right recruitment consultants.

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  • Use your network of contacts to see if they can help you.  Has your boss or peers who have also been made redundant secured a job – are their new employers hiring?  Speak to companies you used to work for and talk directly to the Head of Department or HR.  Are any of your friend’s responsible for hiring and could they try to help you?

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  • Use Social Media to your advantage.  If you are not already signed up to Linked-In or Twitter, you should be.  Both these tools can be effective as you can sign-up to job alerts, research companies quickly, find jobs that may not be advertised on job boards and research interviewers and their backgrounds.  Type Linked-In or Twitter into the search field here on ApproachTheMarket for more information on how to use these tools.

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  • Last but by no means least, try to keep a positive mental attitude throughout your job search, and don’t get hung up by negative or ‘no’ responses to applications.  Instead, get constructive feedback and use this to tailor your next job application(s).  You will get knock backs, but how you deal with them is key.  Keeping to your plan/strategy as suggested in point 2 will help keep you on the right track and in the right frame of mind.

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There are a number of good blog’s on the internet about redundancy, and I have highlighted some of my favourite ones below:

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Tips from Position Ignition

Tips from Redundancy Help

Tips from Turn 2 Us

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From an employment law perspective (and I am no expert in this), these articles below summarise your rights if you are made redundant, what entitlement you may have to redundancy pay and if you can claim benefits, so do take a look.

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Information from Directgov.uk

Information from Moneysavingexpert.com

Information from Thisismoney.co.uk

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Best wishes

Leslie Fearn

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Leslie has over 15 years Recruitment experience helping blue-chip corporates to SME businesses recruit for their Finance teams.  As one of the founding Directors of McGinnis Loy, a Specialist HR and Finance Recruiter across the Thames Valley and London, he is still actively recruiting in the marketplace today.  Follow his helpful tweets on Twitter: @McGinnisLoy

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